Monday, January 31, 2011

Friday, January 28, 2011

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Friday, January 21, 2011

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Saturday, January 15, 2011

Thursday, January 13, 2011

11F-4, January 13

Late in 2010 I put new wheels on my sand cart so I could make formed sculptures. The advantage is that the sand can be filtered to remove shells and rocks. When the sand is clean free-piling is fun but formed is more versatile. The restriction is that the shape of the pile is always a cylinder. Trade-offs.

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Monday, January 3, 2011

11R-1, January 3

A friend of mine came to visit. She wanted to see a sculpture being made, and I wanted to show her, but the weather trumps plans. We walked around in the rain, instead. In the late afternoon the sky cleared and we gravitated toward the beach, where we found a new bluff cut in the beach by the outflow from Kenter Creek. She used her telephone to take these images in the lovely late afternoon storm-washed light.

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Saturday, January 1, 2011

11F-1 (January 1, 2011)

A year into retirement. I decided to start the year with sand sculpture, simplified to its essence. Just do a sculpture, and record only the basics of its brief existence.

That plan lasted about a week. It's mainly Jane's fault that, starting with 11F-4, I started taking that big and heavy camera with me again. "We want to see," she said. Well, OK, eventually I did too.

For this sculpture, though, it was sculpt or freeze. December 30 had been really cold. This day wasn't quite so bad but it still required a windbreaker. I didn't stay for better light. Walking is warmth. Finish the sculpture and start walking.

Later on, Larry used the images to make a 3-D computer model of this sculpture, which he then took to a 3-D printing place. After some clean up he had a small model of the sculpture. It is eerie for me to hold this little model of my work in my hand. The model has an interesting feature: due to the limitations of the process, the interior of the sculpture looks unrefined. When I look at it, I want to get in there with a tiny tool and bring the curves to my vision.

These images have been scaled so that, if looked at side-by-side with a Latchform sculpture, their sizes will be pretty close to what they'd be in the real world. The Short Form, used for this piece, makes a pile about 19 inches across. The Latchform is 21 inches.

Click on an image to see a larger version.
All photographs by Larry Dudock